Tour Description

Managers Tour B

(Combined Adelaide and South Coast Departure)
Six Days: 17th – 22nd February 2021

Twin Share: $2195 per person. Sole Use: $2559 per person.

Included in the tour:

  • Home pick-ups & set downs (most metro areas – please contact us for details)
  • Picnic-style morning teas & all meals as per the itinerary
  • All accommodation & admissions to all attractions
  • Experienced & informative tour driver/guide.

 

Come on an exploration of South Australia with a difference! On this tour we discover the amazing range of silo art and other street art that has been recently completed in regional SA. There are massive and amazing silo artworks, painted water towers, magnificent murals, and even a couple of new light shows! We also enjoy some of the delights of Port Lincoln. This will be a fabulous trip of fun and art—I hope you can join me!

 

Day On– WEDNESDAY 17 FEBRUARY 2021

(includes light lunch and two course dinner)

After completing home pick ups (limited areas*) we begin our journey north, with a stop at Roseworthy for morning tea. We travel through the regional towns of Tarlee and Auburn to the village of Farrell Flat. Originally surveyed as Hanson in 1870, it became Farrell Flat in 1940 and was the centre for a thriving farming community, located on the former Peterborough Railway Line. While today, its population might be small (less than 300 residents live in Farrell Flat), they are highly motivated, attracting a government grant for the latest silo art project in our state. Scheduled to be complete in November 2021, these are the first silo artworks for artist Jarrod Soden, a South Australian local.

From here we turn west and travel the short distance to Clare, where we will stop to enjoy lunch.

This afternoon we make our way towards the Copper Coast, stopping in Snowtown along the way. In 2018, artist Joel Van More ‘made over’ a disused water tower in the centre of town and it is now a colourful celebration of local volunteers and sports stars.

Travelling across the top of Yorke Peninsula we arrive in Kadina mid-afternoon. In the 1850’s, copper mining was the main industry for this area, but it is now a prosperous agricultural region.

The town’s story is celebrated through a magnificent art piece on the Kadina water tower which has been transformed with the image of a young maypole girl holding copper and wheat. It signifies the Cornish history of the area, as well as the discovery of copper and rich farming heritage. In addition, the tower features a steam engine which represents the rail line that serviced the area.

In fact, the towns and villages of the Copper Coast have enthusiastically embraced the concept of public art and there are a number of colourful and quirky works to be found. Wallaroo, a very popular holiday destination on the coast of the Spencer Gulf, is a short drive from Kadina and is home to a number of murals highlighting the town’s rail and shipping heritage. One is featured at the Old Wallaroo Railway Station, along the face of the platform. This mural is a work of three parts by Moonta artist Julie Cheshire, the second stage only completed in May 2020.

From here we return to Kadina and our accommodation for the evening at the Kadina Gateway Motor Inn (Ph 08 8821 2777). There will be time to relax before dinner and then later this evening, we will return to Wallaroo to enjoy the Silo Light Show at sunset. Commencing only in December this year, the display is a showcase of the unique history, events and characters of the Copper Coast.

Paul’s notes: Today is one of the days we’ve reworked a few times through the planning stages, because we kept finding new places to visit and see! The first silo art we see on this trip is also the very latest to be completed. The Farrell Flat silos were only finished late 2020, so it’s great to be able to fit this artwork into our tour. I’m also looking forward to seeing the brand new light show  on the silos at Wallaroo!

Day Two – THURSDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2021

(includes cooked breakfast, light lunch and two course dinner)

Departing Kadina this morning, we journey north along the Spencer Highway, passing through Port Broughton and Port Pirie, before arriving in Port Germein. A peaceful and popular holiday destination, Port Germein is home to a 1676 metre long jetty, the longest in South Australia and reputedly the longest in the southern hemisphere! We will stop to enjoy morning tea and the opportunity to take a short walk along the jetty if so desired.

Leaving the coast, we take a stunning scenic drive west through Port Germein Gorge, where the trees and ranges hug the road. We come to the country town of Wirrabara, renowned for its forestry heritage and rich farming history. The silos here were completed in October 2018 and are the amazing work of Australian artist Smug, aka Sam Bates. Standing 28 metres high, these silos depict a wood cutter and red-capped robin and use natural colours to capture the natural beauty of the region.

This afternoon we travel north through Melrose and Wilmington, admiring the views of the Southern Flinders Ranges and Mount Remarkable, before turning west again onto Horrocks Pass. Named after explorer John Horrocks who travelled through the pass in 1840 on an ill-fated expedition, this is the perfect opportunity to relax and admire the spectacular countryside that surrounds.

After re-joining the highway, it’s not long before we arrive in Port Augusta, a seaport and railway junction city at the top end of the Spencer Gulf. Tonight we will be staying with some of our favourite hosts at the Standpipe Golf Motor Inn (Ph: 08 8642 4033).

We settle into our accommodation before departing this evening for the historic railway town of Quorn, located north of Port Augusta. Its well preserved buildings and old style charm have made it the historic set for a number of movie scenes including Gallipoli, The Lighthorseman and many others.

After dinner in town, when the sun starts to set, we’ll take up our position at the Quorn Silos for a light show spectacular. This stunning display springs to life under the stars and features fascinating stories of the region using special lighting effects and sound. It celebrates the Flinders Ranges, the Pichi Richi Railway, local stories and heritage.

At the end of the show, we return to Port Augusta and our motel for a good night’s rest.

Paul’s notes:  Today has a number of highlights for me. I’m looking forward to getting back to Port Germein—it’s been years since I’ve taken a walk on this amazing jetty. The drive through the Germein Gorge is stunning and the countryside is gorge-ous (!). The Quorn silos will also be a highlight, as I’m looking forward to experiencing the special light show. It should be a fun night out.

 Day Three – FRIDAY 19 FEBRUARY 2021

(includes cooked breakfast, light lunch and two course dinner)

Today, we begin our journey travelling inland to Kimba, situated at the northern edge of Eyre Peninsula’s vast grain growing belt. Kimba is the centre of a major wheat growing area and the site of one of South Australia’s largest inland grain terminals. It is also the home of the Big Galah and an impressive mural which adorns the wheat silos. The second silo artwork to be completed in South Australia in September 2017, the mural stretches over five and a half silos, measuring 60 metres wide and 25 metres tall. Painted by Melbourne artist Cam Scale, the impressive artwork depicts a young child in a wheat field at sunset.

After morning tea and time admiring this remarkable artwork, we continue our travels, heading south to the coast. We journey through Cleve, destined for the seaside town of Arno Bay. This relaxing coastal town is a popular spot for fisherman, being home of the SA Kingfish. We will stop here for lunch, with time to admire the surrounds.

From here we continue along the coast and there is no escaping the beauty of the peninsula, as we travel through farmland, coastal scrub and into some of the many tranquil bays. We will take time to look around the coastal holiday town of Port Neill, before continuing to Port Lincoln, where we stay for two nights in the lovely Port Lincoln Hotel (Ph: 1300 766 100) overlooking the magnificent Boston Bay.

The town of Port Lincoln was discovered by Matthew Flinders while under commission by the British Admiralty to chart Australia’s unexplored coastline. He arrived in Boston Bay in February 1802 and named the area Port Lincoln after his native Lincolnshire in England.

Paul’s notes: This is definitely the long way around from Port Augusta to Port Lincoln, but it’s well worth it! The Kimba silo is another that I have only experienced in photos, but it looks absolutely amazing. Also, It will be nice to get by the coast—it’s a beautiful part of the world to enjoy. I’m looking forward to settling in for a couple of nights at Port Lincoln. The hotel here is really lovely and perfectly located by the foreshore.

Day Four – SATURDAY 20 FEBRUARY 2021

(includes cooked breakfast, light lunch and two course dinner)

After breakfast, we cross the base of the Eyre Peninsula to Coffin Bay, located on one of the most beautiful estuaries in Australia. This area offers unparalleled views of vast expanses of meandering waterways with bays, channels and inlets. Coffin Bay is known for its world-famous oysters, so we take the opportunity to visit a Coffin Bay oyster farm. We cruise the waterway to look at the first original oyster farm in Coffin Bay, enjoying views of the town from a different perspective. We learn about the history of oyster farming from a farmer himself, and have the opportunity to taste fresh oysters which are shucked on board.

While in Coffin Bay, we stop for morning tea refreshments and explore their local public art project, a mural on the Coffin Bay Community Hall.

Returning to Port Lincoln, we enjoy lunch before experiencing one of the highlights of a visit to the Eyre Peninsula. Boarding an Adventure Bay Cruise we set out to explore Boston Bay. This magnificent bay is one of the world’s largest protected natural harbours, stretching from the tip of the Port Lincoln National Park to Point Boston. It covers an area more than three and a half times the size of Sydney Harbour! As we cruise, we take in the canals of the Lincoln Cove Marina, Porter Bay, Port Lincoln National Park and Boston Island. Weather permitting, we may also see the local Sea Lion colony.

After disembarking, we return to our accommodation with time to relax or take a walk on the foreshore before dinner.

Paul’s notes: I really wanted to spend a little time here enjoying the best of what Port Lincoln and the tip of the Eyre Peninsula have to offer. Of course, one of the big things about this area is the production of top quality oysters in the clean waters of Coffin Bay. Then there’s the fresh seafood caught nearby, so we’ve arranged for fish and chips for lunch today. Then it’s out on Boston Bay! This is going to be a great day in Port Lincoln!

Day Five – SUNDAY 21 FEBRUARY 2021

(includes cooked breakfast, light lunch and two course dinner)

After farewelling our hosts in Port Lincoln, we travel back along the coast to our first stop, Tumby Bay. This sheltered bay boasts predominantly white, sandy beaches, making it a popular holiday destination, but it is also home to the Colour Tumby Street Art Festival. Occurring in April each year, this event attracts street artists from across the globe and the work of these artists can be seen in a number of locations throughout the town.

The first, and no doubt the largest work, is the Tumby Bay silos. Inspired by a photo of two local boys jumping off the Tumby Bay Jetty, this impressive piece was completed in April 2018 by Argentian street artist Martin Ron. After admiring the work we continue into the town to enjoy morning tea and explore more public art.

Travelling on, we reach the small township of Cowell, located on Franklin Harbour. Cowell is surrounded by an agricultural district of wheat and sheep farming which is supplemented by the fishing and oyster farms. A popular spot for holiday makers, we will take the opportunity to stop and enjoy lunch before visiting the Cowell silo artwork. This mural features Lionel Deer and his camel Diamantina, a duo that is well known to the local community having participated in the Cowell Christmas Pageant for over 30 years.

The final stretch of our day’s journey brings us to Whyalla, an Aboriginal term meaning “place with deep water.” The third most populous city in South Australia, Whyalla is known as the ‘Steel City’ due to its integrated steelworks and ship building heritage. Just this year the city unveiled a brand new jetty, that is uniquely-shaped and a showpiece for the local community. We will definitely visit while here.

We check into our accommodation at the Alexander Motel (Ph: 08 8645 9488) for our last night on tour.

Paul’s notes:  Today is going to be a highlight of the trip! Tumby Bay has made itself into a true street art town. The amazing silos are just the start, with a huge number of incredible murals all around the town. I’m looking forward to having a good look around Tumby Bay. Whyalla has another brand new feature that I’m looking forward to seeing—a very special and different jetty!

 Day Six – MONDAY 22 FEBRUARY 2021

(includes cooked breakfast, two course lunch)

We depart Whyalla after breakfast and begin our journey home. Not far out of the city, we detour east to Point Lowly, to experience the spectacular coastal scenery and view the historic lighthouse and cottages. Dating back to 1883, the lighthouse was originally built to be 15 metres tall, but was extended a further 8 metres in 1909.

Continuing to Port Augusta we stop for morning tea, before starting our travels down the eastern side of the peninsula. We pass Port Pirie and journey onto the town of Crystal Brook, named after the spring-fed creek near where the town was founded. We will stop here to enjoy lunch and take a drive down the main street to spot their very own public art pieces.

Travelling south, it’s not long before we near Port Wakefield and sight the Gulf of St Vincent. As we continue towards home, there is time to reflect on the amazing public artworks we have seen and the beautiful scenery that has inspired us on our journey.

Paul’s notes: Every trip has to have an ending and today we head home. I’m hoping that you’ll have had a fabulous time enjoying the incredible artworks scattered around the state, plus a few other highlights as well!